How it Began | Maryland Equine Photographer

It’s a question that is asked pretty often when people find out that I’m an equine photographer: “How did you get started?”

Unfortunately, I didn’t have the opportunity to grow up around horses like many others did.  Instead, my sister and I would go trail riding a few times a year.  One time, we got really desperate and attempted to ride one of our grandparent’s steer around our property.  Buck was such a saint for putting up with our shenanigans!

It wasn’t until 2014 that I truly got involved with horses.  That was the year that I started volunteering at Freedom Hill Horse Rescue in Dunkirk, Maryland as a feed shift member and equine photographer.  It’s one of the best decisions I have ever made.

Tucker, a 13 year old Saddlebred gelding, prances in front of a fence at Freedom Hill Horse Rescue in Dunkirk, Maryland.  Photo by equine photographer Kristina Truluck.

I have never had any formal education on photographing horses.  Instead, I relied on the training that I have in combat photography (which is the coolest job to have in the military, by the way) and information I found within the depths of Google.  Photographing horses and combat are similar in that you don’t quite know what to expect when you first get acquainted.  It’s unpredictable, messy, and a ton of poop is involved.

Junior, a 20 year old Welsh Pony gelding, pokes his head between the boards of a fence at Freedom Hill Horse Rescue in Dunkirk, Maryland.  Photo by equine photographer Kristina Truluck.

Volunteering for Freedom Hill Horse Rescue has opened the door to many other opportunities: vets, farriers and trainers wanting professional quality photos of them at work and horse owners wanting to preserve memories of their best four-legged friends.

If you’re a photographer, I highly recommend reaching out to a nearby rescue.  It’s a wonderful opportunity and the gorgeous photos helps get horses into their forever homes.

 

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